Exeter Cricket: Coaver Club: Westbrick vs Luckham Oaks

June 20th, 2014

18th June 2014 A selection of photographs from the end of the first innings and beginning of the second http://charleswhittonphotography.com/exeter-cricket-westbrick-vs-luckham

Bowled!

Cricket: Westbrick vs Luckham Oaks June 2014 Coaver Club Exeter
Composite image produced in the Gnu Image Manipulating Program (Gimp)
Click image for larger – and larger – image. Ask for a full size one by all means.

Exeter Cricket: Coaver Club Coaver vs Geriatrics

June 19th, 2014

I wandered across the road and took pictures of cricket which are available at http://charleswhittonphotography.com/exeter-cricket-coaver-vs-the

Exeter Geriatrics Cricket Club website

Coaver Club events timetable

Advice to Employers: not General Practice

June 16th, 2014

Whether the amount of variation of sick leave between Devon and the average in England is statistically significant is doubtful, even if it is then in business or social terms it is of little importance. http://www.exeterexpressandecho.co.uk/People-Devon-sick-days-UK-average/story-21242636-detail/story.html?ito=email_newsletter_exeterexpressandecho

What is worth noting is that the advice some employers apparently feel GPs give poorly is of course Occupational Health advice, or Occupational Medicine, and oddly enough this is something that employers should be getting from Occupational Health departments in their businesses or from Occupational Medicine doctors in OH/OM Practices. Not GPs. Now which employers will it be who are complaining that they don’t get the good advice they feel entitled to, free, from doctors who have many other things to do which are either in their specialty, paid for, or both? Perhaps the ones that are too mean to buy Occ. Health services; and who operate the Bradford Score on employees who have odd days off not as a means to pick out who they ought to think about, but as if it were a justification for “disciplinary” action.

That’d be the ones that cause psychological illness in their employees, piss them off and lose effectiveness and willingness, and persuade mildly ill employees to come in and infect their co-workers instead of calling a duvet day.

The Express & Echo is owned by the owners of the Daily Mail, a rag(e) resembling a newspaper in shape, but is in general a local paper and therefore interesting.

Fragment of a Calendar

June 16th, 2014

Memory card formatting: From Canon

June 8th, 2014

“Memory card formatting trick

When a memory card is formatted in the camera, only the file management information is changed. The data itself remains on the card until it is over-written by new data. This is why it is possible to recover ‘lost’ images even after formatting. Whilst it could be a benefit to recover ‘lost’ images, it is something you should be aware of when selling or discarding memory cards or using them in a different camera. To minimise the chance, after formatting the card, take pictures with the camera with the lens cap on, until the memory card is full. This will help to overwrite the pre-existing data.”

http://cpn.canon-europe.com/content/education/tipsandtricks.do?filter=reset#age=112982

If someone tells you that formatting secures your clinical data satisfactorily, they havn’t done their homework, have they.

With big cards, overwriting them with zeros or the traditional DEADBEEF pattern of Hex values in the computer is probably more conveneint once you have that set up.

Petition about climate change coverage

May 21st, 2014

Dear Editor,
I present here a petition signed by 1843 people calling upon UK media outlets to eschew time-wasting debates about the science or significance of climate change and instead to make a concerted effort to conduct meaningful discussions about the constructive responses that are at our disposal.

Since this petition was started, there have been a number of other calls to the media, not least from the UK parliament’s science and technology committee, demanding a responsible approach to coverage of climate change. While there are signs that some outlets are responding to this request, there is still much ground to cover.

The upcoming IPCC summary report of Working Group III provides an unparalleled opportunity to open up genuinely informative, cross-disciplinary and ground-breaking debates about the actions at our disposal that can help with both mitigation and adaptation to this plane tary crisis.

It is critically important that people gain a full understanding of all the options and their implications. The media has great power, and great responsibility, and the signatories to this petition call on you to fulfil your duty to inform the public sufficiently, in order that a public mandate can be secured for policies that restore rather than further degrade the viability of the planet’s ecosystems and climate.

The background information to the petition is available at https://you.38degrees.org.uk/petitions/to-the-media-please-debate-the-constructive-responses-to-climate-change-not-its-existence.

I look forward to your response.

I signed the petition ‘To the Media: Please Debate the Constructive Responses to Climate Change, Not Its Existence’.

Linux migration for Exeter and Devon

May 11th, 2014

would be a good idea, I think. It went well for Munich.

http://www.linuxvoice.com/the-big-switch/

Killerton Races Photography

May 7th, 2014

We took over 1000 pictures of the runners at the Killerton Races Relish Racing organised. Nice day. Images to inspect and buy at http://www.charleswhittonphotography.com/killerton-races

A tree and a slope (on the Killerton Races Course)

Registration of patients with practices instead of doctors.

April 20th, 2014

We don’t have patients any more. The DoH/NHS management was very keen to remove the personal list a few years back, and make patients register with the Practice, not the doctor. WHen I had 2000 patients as a single-hander I might well have forgotten a few names, although not usually a face, but a doctor in a group with 30 000 patients cannot reasonably be expected to know them all.

The recent announcement that as an entirely new innovation by our current government GPs are now to tell all our patients over 75 who their named GP is reminds me of the chocolate ration in 1984.

Anyway, your GP is almost certainly who you think it is, and if you don’t care who it is you are under 75, are you not? Over 75 – you’ll have seen many brief changes that are reverted when someone young realises that their elders had worked this out generations ago. In that moment the young learned something, but if they’d just asked it would have been less trouble.

Appraisal: Dimensions not Domains

April 18th, 2014

Domain is a bounded area, volume, body.

Clearly communication and trust – to pick two of the “domains” – are not without intersection, trust is achieved by communication among other things, and communication is modified by trust relationships (they are a big thing in Crypto).

What these things actually are are dimensions.

Any item, any point in a continuum of things we do is describable by coordinates along each of the dimensions in a phase space of an arbitrarily large number of dimensions. (Pemberton for instance got wrong the activities within the consultation by describing 9 dimensions other than time as “levels”).

Recognising this would have allowed the College and Deanery grandees and whizzes to have spoken English instead of generating a new jargon, to have taken advantage of a well-developed and understood framework for analysis, and to have designed better forms where for each action you do you are invited to locate it along – at present – 7 axes. (Note that an action/item/atom might have a location of [0,0,0,0,0,11,0] stating that it was purely of one “domain” with no component of any of the others, and that it was of maximal extent – naturally the scale should go up to 11. The challenges then would include reflecting on how such a pure form had been achieved)

Among the benefits would be a focus on describing what you do and what it achieves rather than searching what you have done for things you can fit badly into a set of boxes.

Reflect that.